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Current
May 7, 2012 8:00pm PDT
quote capability against every in the country everyone in the united states. and they started by taking commercial data in from at&t on everyone approximately 3 oh
Current
May 7, 2012 8:00pm PDT
quote every in the country everyone in the united states. and they started by taking commercial data in from at&t on everyone approximately 3 oh 20 million calls a day were recorded by this device. that was just the initial participation. >> can i interrupt for just a
CSPAN
May 2, 2012 7:00am EDT
use as a launching pad for attacks against the united states. >> thank you. let me just conclude by saying that former cia director mike hayden used used the analogy of a football field, the lines on the football field, and he talked about our intelligence operatives and others as the players on the field. and he said we need them to get chalk on their cleats, go right up to the line in carrying out what our approved policies of the united states. and if you think about it that way, it is really important to have policies that are transparent so that those who are carrying out the mission and those in the united states and those around the world who are trying to understand the mission know where the lines are. if we don't know what the lines are, some people will be risk averse, other people commit excesses. we have certain seeing a few of those, which are black eyes on our country. so i just want to applaud the fact that john brennan has come over here from the white house, spent over an hour with us, laying out in great detail what the rules are for something that has been reveal
FOX News
May 1, 2012 3:00pm EDT
the president of the united states is on the ground in afghanistan. of course, we are in afghanistan because the attacks of 9/11 and now we know that president obama is meeting with afghanistan's president karzai, an unannounced and secret visit until this moment. some describe the relationship between our president and president karzai as "complicated." which could be the unstatement of the day. casey in point: a u.s. government released yesterday. new details of the level of corruption in afghanistan. and the unthinkable waste of billions upon billions of american tax dollars. officials in afghanistan are stealing american money according to the report. the afghan attorney general's office avoids prosecuting high profile corruption cases among other things. that's the situation as the president is on the ground if afghanistan our chief white house correspondent is at the white house. did you get any idea of this? and what do we expect to accomplish? >>reporter: the president's schedule was wide open all day leaving the possibility that he could have been going somewhere
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 10:30pm EDT
organization. since 2009, the reset in relations between russia and the united states there, have been many successes, including the s.t.a.r.t. treaty, cooperation on afghanistan, iran, and north korea. civilian nuclear power, and other areas. but there have been notable differences over syria, missile defense, human rights, enforcement of intellectual property rights and con dufkt elections last month. both president put spin and president obama have called for a deepening of economic cooperation between the two countries. the russian state duma its expected to ratify russia's succession to the wto in june or july. we expect 30 days after that, roughly, that russia will become a member of the world trade organization. for the united states, to take advantage of the new market openings in the russian market, congress must pass legislation to grant russia permanent normal trade relations treatment. the panel today will focus on prospects for improving relations with russia, and how the wto process has prompted russia to take measures to open its economy, to more international trade and inves
CSPAN
May 10, 2012 5:00pm EDT
jobs bills that are sitting in the united states senate. he can start by putting americans to work by aproviding the keystone pipeline. he could do something about sky high gas prices by increasing american energy production and he could empower small businesses by cutting red tape and reempleg the regulatory process. he could deal with our crippling debt by encouraging democrats to pass a duj et. look, we want to work with the president, but it's about time that he gets serious, focused on jobs, focused on our economy and enough with the gimmicks. >>. [ inaudible ] >> doing a very good job. i do believe when it comes to fast and furious, we've got to get to the bottom of what happened and who's responsible. and the committee is doing that and i'm supporting their efforts. >> does that mean you are sea supporting -- he is in the process of right now writing a resolution you're supporting a resolution. >> i'm supporting in their efforts to hold those people in the department of justice accountable for what happened. the committee has work to do. they know what they have to do. they're
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 2:30pm EDT
in 1949 that the united states will host a nato summit. it's onlial first time hosted in a city other than washington. the other two times the united states has hosted nato summits were in 1978 and 1999 which, of course, was the 50th anniversary during president clinton's term. as i've said, 61 countries as well as the eu, the united nations and the world bank will be in attendance. they'll be a different grouping, if you will, of countries during the course of the day. as i said, the president will fly to chicago on saturday evening. the first meeting that he'll have on sunday will be with president karzai of afghanistan. obviously, an important meeting because a central focus of the summit will be on afghanistan and afghanistan's future. so the first meeting of the day appropriately is going to be with president karzai of afghanistan. the president will then move into various, a series of nato immediatings. initial meeting with just the nato allies at 28. that evening, on sunday evening, the nato allies will meet at soldier field for a working dinner and that will be leaders p
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 10:00am EDT
gone. that brings a change. missouri's own harry truman now becomes president of the united states. very interesting circumstances, obviously. we are just about to wrap up the war in europe. we are island hopping our way to japan. i mean, it looks promising, and yet there are all kinds of potholes along the way. we still have to finish the defeat of germany. we still have to finish off japan. how we do that, when we do that, and then one of the consequences of what we're doing, that's the rest of this story. truman is going to meet with stalin and churchill in potsdam, germany, after hitler is defeated. it's a new big three now with harry truman being the president now instead of roosevelt. truman's attitude is going to be very different from that of roosevelt, and some indication of that change of u.s. policy comes right away. remember i mentioned to you that even vice president harry truman had not been kept informed of the manhattan project. when he becomes president it's like, okay, there are a few things that you probably need to know. one of them is we've been working on a bomb and
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 3:30pm EDT
evaluative and educational process that does justice to this committee and justice to the united states senate ratification process, i announce today that i do not currently intend to bring the treaty to a vote before the november elections. we will have extensive hearings. we will do our due diligence. we'll prepare for a vote, but unless somehow the dynamic were to shift or change, we will wait until the passions of the election have subsided before we vote. my hope and expectation is that everyone will exhaust all avenues of inquiry and carefully consider the arguments on both sides. the contentious political season will now give us a chance to do what this committee has historically done best, which is not to politicize but to spend serious thoughtful time deliberating and debating all of the questions of substance. i'm pleased to see that the internet is already beginning to buzz with some discussion of this. but i will say up front there's a lot of misinformation and there's a certain amount of mythology, so i look forward to the process of clearing up the misinformation and the mytholog
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 9:30pm EDT
that birth rights dramatically changed from the better and the provision is unique to the united states. this is a half hour. thanks to both of you for joining us. you will be talking about at this conference about birth right citizenship. set the stage for us in what is birth right citizenship. >> in a nut shell, this is the principal that any person born in the united states regardless of the status of their parents and theiran set offers and race and gender and religion and any other category is a citizen of the united states by virtue of being born here. you can become a citizen if you are an immigrant. the important point is this was not a principal that goes to the constitution. in the civil rights act of 1866. the first clause of the 14th amendment said any person born in the united states with or two minor exceptions were thought to be citizens of their own sovereignties, but any person born in the united states is a citizen. this was not necessarily the case of the civil war, the most dramatic example was dread scott in which the supreme court stated that no black person could be a c
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:30am EDT
place it in a larger perspective, and that is by non-indians who want equality in the united states, wrapping themselves in the flag, and native peoples were here first, and survival, the fact that they have survived as separate cultures uniquely on the planet as american indians is, to me, the most noteworthy. they have not melded into the mainstream. by and large, tribes are still operating. some are in better shape than others, some are larger, some are smaller. some have suffered more, some have suffered slightly less, but they are still here, and if i wanted to change one thing, i would like the mainstream of america to realize that american indians, as tribes and tribal people, are still here, still a vibrant part of the economy, a part of the culture, a part of the arts, literature, music, this is, after all, oklahoma is, after all, an american indian state at its start, and american indians have not disappeared or vanished into the mainstream with dinosaurs, as some people are prone to ask me sometimes. >>> find out where skrchlt span's local content vehicles are going next online at
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 12:30am EDT
the cold war is not done yet. it's not just the fall of china. it's not just the united states cozying up to japan. but it's going to explode the cold war is going to heat up if you will, in korea. now, remember the last lecture, world war ii? we talked about korea being occupied by japan. once the war is over, the united states and the soviet union decide to divide korea with the united states being in control of the southern part of korea, the soviet union is going to be administering the northern part of korea. eventually, both u.s. and ussr agree that we will withdraw and allow the koreans to have some degree of self-determination. we're going to pull out, soviet union's going to pull out. the koreans will be able to determine their future and their fate. and we both did. the difference is, when we pulled out, we basically took everything with us. when the soviet union pulled out, they left behind a stockpile of weapons. the most modern military technology that they had at the time, and that's the temptation that was going to be used the following summer, 1950, north korea with the
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 5:00pm EDT
united states. very interesting circumstances. obviously. we are just about to wrap up the war in europe. we are island hopping our way to japan. i mean, it looks promising and yet there are all kinds of potholes along the way. we still have to finish the defeat of germany. we still have to finish off japan. how we do that, when we do that, and then what are the consequences of what we're doing, that's the rest of this story. true man truman is going to mee with stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeatedh stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.truman stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.truman stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.truman stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.ruman i stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.pgermany after hitler's defeated.pogerma defeated.tsgermany after hitler defeated.dgermany after hitler' defeated.agermany after hitler' defeated.mgermany after hitler' defeated.potsdam germany after hitler's defeated defeated.,germany after hitler' defeated.potsd
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm EDT
causization. there's a whole range of grievances that the united states had against great britain in the early 19th century. many are associated with maritime disputes between great britain and the united states because this is the middle of that -- napolian wars. they are trying to establish trade, and they are impressing seamen from american vessels because they need to script crews to keep the royal navy manned because they were disputing with the british and the indians on the frontier, and british policy affected the prizes very badly, and prizes for american exports slumped during this period causing an agricultural depression making people angry. there's a whole range of those sort of grievances. basically, i think why the war was ultimately fought and why it was fought when it was because many of the disputes have been preceded in 1812 by a number of years without necessarily producing the declaration of war was that by the summer of 1811, the main grievance was something called the council, a british form of executive order, the american equivalent is the executive order iss
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 12:30pm EDT
they would look like the united states senate, or congress. but the fact is they're not a permanent member of the council. >> uh-huh. >> we are. and as a permanent member of council, in fact, i think we're the only permanent member. and so we stand in a very special status that we are not currently able to exercise, and i think with respect to the senator's fears, and other fears, what you're trying to protect is something that would go against the interests of our country. that's what we need to be able to protect. if sudan votes to do something or blocks us from doing something that we're interested in doing, then there are plenty of other avenues of recourse for that, too. >> uh-huh. >> but if you're dealing with the oceans and dealing with this question of royalties and other things, the fact that we would preserve the right to protect our interests, i think what the senator and others have raised as an issue is, they don't want money going to dictators. they don't want money going to bad actor countries. we can block that. we can block that until the cows come home. and so i th
CSPAN
May 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
united states. and a certain group of american leaders thought that it should be the bald eagle but another group said no, the image of the united states, the seal should show moses leading the children of israel out of bondage and into the promised land. there was this heated debate. america came this close to having moses as its national symbol. you got the folically challenged bird instead. but the authors of the moses seal were none other than thomas jefferson and benjamin franklin. so they had internalized the biblical narrative. now, for many of this generation of founding mothers and founding fathers, the fact that they were the new israel meant that they had a kinship relationship with the old israel, the jewish people. it meant since they were -- they had inherited a new promised land. they had a connection with the old promised land. and they concluded that to be good christians, to be good americans, it was their divinely ordained duty to help the old israel go back and restore their ancient kingdom to help god fulfill his promises to them in the bible, rescue them from e
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 5:30am EDT
united states is proud to be hosting in chicago on may 20th and may 21st. with your permission, senator, i would like to submit my full statement and summarize my comments here. >> we appreciate and without objection the full statement will be in the record. >> i appreciate the support and the sustained recognition of the significance of this alliance, transatlantic security. this chicago summit will be the first on american soil in 13 years and the first ever outside of washington. in adang to the community to showcase our nation's great cities a symbol of nato to the united states. it is also an opportunity to underscore to the american people the continued value of this alliance and security challenges we face today. nearly 18 months ago the allies unveiled a new strategic concept for focus in the 21st century. building on the decisions taking in lisbon, the allies have three objectives. was a capabilities and partnerships and if i might, i'd like to say a few words about these. on afghanistan the isaf coalition has prevented that country from serving as a safe haven for terrorists a
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 9:30pm EDT
just the fall of china and it's not just the united states cozying up to japan. it's going to explode the cold war and it will heat up in korea. now remember the last lecture of world war ii. we talked about korea being occupied by japan. once the war is over, the united states and the soviet union decide to divide korea with the united states being in control of the southern part of korea and the sev yet union is going to be administering the northern part of korea. eventually both u.s. and uss r agree we will withdraw and allow them to have a degree of self determination. we are going pull out and the soviet union will and the koreans will be able to determine their future and fate. we both did. the difference is when we pulled out, we took everything with us. when the soviet union pulled out, they left a stockpile of weapons. the most mot earn technology they had at the time. that's a temptation that was going to be used. the following summer with the use of soviet military armaments, they will innovate and try to take possession of the country. this is what they had warned us abou
CSPAN
May 2, 2012 3:30pm EDT
the net rate of undocumented population growth in the united states. simple equation in demography. net migration equals in migration minus out migration. you don't affect in migration, you dramatically reduce out migration, net migration increases. that's the sort of the rapid growth of undocumented migration into the united states. by militarizing the border with our closest trading partner, closest neighbor, with canada in the hemisphere, we didn't solve the problem of illegal migration. we made it worse. we transformed what had been a circular flow of male workers going to three states and turned it into a settled population of families living in 50 states, and double the net rate of undocumented population growth in the process. so now we have 11 million people living in this country out of status. and these people are a great loss, represent a great loss of human capital to the nation, because there is nowhere for them to go. they cannot use their skills to their utmost productivity. they cannot use their education. they are confined to a black market, informal sector in the
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 9:00pm EDT
united states. very interesting circumstances. we are just about to wrap up the war in europe and island hopping the way to japan. yet there all kind of potholes along the way. we have to defeat germany and finish off japan and how we do that and when we do that. the consequences of what we are doing is the rest of this story. truman will meet with stalin and churchill in germany after hitler is defeated. it's a new big three with harry truman being the president. truman's attitude is different. some indication of that change of u.s. policy comes right away. even harry truman was not kept informed. it was like okay, a few things you need to know. one is we have been working on a bomb. you know what? it's the biggest baddest bomb around. truman gets the word that it works. we have detonated an atomic bomb. it works. he goes over to stalin. lit her has been defeated and we want to cooperate with you, but i need to let you in on a secret. the secret is we are going to end this war with japan because we have an atomic weapon the likes of which the world has never seen. they were kept
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 12:30am EDT
unique to the united states. this is half an hour. >>> american history tv is in milwaukee at the organization of american historians annual meeting and we're joined by professor eric foner from columbia university and linda kerber with the university of iowa. thanks to both of you for joining us. you'll be talking about at this conference about birthright citizenship and the 14th amendment. why don't you set the stage for us, mr. foner, and what is birthright citizenship? >> well, in a nutshell, this is the principle that any person born in the united states, regardless of the status of their parents, their ancestors, regardless of their race, gender, religion, any other category, is a citizen of the united states just by the virtue of being boerch here. of course you can also become a citizen by naturalization if you're an immigrant. but the important point is this was not a principle that goes all the way back to the institution constitution. it was really implemented or institutionalized in the aftermath of the civil war and the 14th amendment which wrote it into the constitut
FOX News
May 3, 2012 3:00pm EDT
feel it but people in all three states feel the united states should get out of afghanistan by a 2-1 margin. but most approve of the job that obama is doing there. a gender gap is on display. it is too close to call in florida where the president is down but it is 13 points in ohio. and he has a 17-point edge among women in pennsylvania. >>reporter: thank you on the perfect strange day in washington, dc. another former aide to john edwards on the witness stand today. he said he overher the foam presidential candidate asking his mistress whether her baby bump was showing. the foam aide here in the blue tie and glasses said in 26 fix he saw the mistress get off the elevator on the same floor as john edwards and the foam aide says the mistress told him she and john edwards were madly if love. and the next day the aide says john edwards called him to deny he was having an affair and told him rielle hunter was crazy. not long after that run in the aide said campaign staffers had to stay in a different hotel floor from the presidential candidate, but one day in 2007 he went to john edwar
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 10:00am EDT
open, honest, and comprehensive discussion about whether the united states of america should join the law of the sea convention. i want to underscore the word comprehensive. i've heard from countless military and business leaders for some period of time who believe it is urgent that we ratify this treaty. and i've also spoken with senators and some groups who oppose the treaty. i intend to make certain that the committee does its job properly and thoroughly. we will hear from all sides and we will ask all the questions as we begin the process of educational hearings on this issue. the first since 2007. the senate has seen a fair number of new members elected since then from both sides of the aisle. and our committee also has new members. so i think a thorough examination of the treaty is especially timely and relevant. some of us have had the opportunity in the past to the evaluate this treaty and even to vote on it in this committee. i am personally deeply supportive of it, and i believe it is now more urgent than ever that we ratify it because to remain outside of it is fundamen
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 8:00pm EDT
immigration and the roots of pleuralism in the united states. this one hour and 15 minute class took place at ball state university in indiana.uralism i. this one hour and 15 minute class took place at ball state university in indiana. >>> on tuesday with in class we looked at the social in europe and one of the ways european governments attempted to appease the classes, reduce social tension, and one of the tools they used was mass politics as we talked about. that's also something going on in the united states but in the united states that process takes on a much different context, and the main reason for that is that in the u.s. you have universal white male suffrage by 1820 unlike in europe where it is france and the 1870s and other countries later on, in the u.s. you have basically full mass democracy very early on and you have it before most immigrants he show up, so when the immigrants begin to be integrated into american society and particularly when they begin to be integrated into american politics, they're being integrated into a much different world than are those immigrants th
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 12:30pm EDT
. in 2008, the illegal population in the united states peaked. between 2008 and 2009 it actually fell from 12 million to 11 million people. since 2009, it's held steady at 11 -- probably trending downward. on a net basis, illegal mig sgrags now zero or negative. the border is in fact under control. the number of apprehensions -- 22,000 officers and they're having a harder time finding anybody to arrest. apprehensions at the mexico-u.s. border are now lower than at any time since 1972. have more and more officers chasing fewer and fewer people. part of this is the collapse in labor demand. particularly in residential home construction. after the great recession of 2008. but it's also been because the united states is quietly, without anybody really noticing, dramatically expanded temporary legal migration. given the choice, of course, migrants would much rather come here with legal documents. and in 2010, there were 517,000 -- 537,000 entries of mexicans into the united states with temporary work visas. the largest number of in history. so one of the reasons that illegal mig sgrag
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 5:30pm EDT
, demonstrations in the streets of the united states. any one of these crises could have defined a presidency. for example, if we look at president jimmy carter's administration, it involved notable successes, but it's best remembered for the iranian hostage issue. when the iranians took over the american embassy in tehran, and then held hostage americans for more than a year. think about mcnamara. in january 1968, the north koreans seized the uss pueblo naval vessel on the high seas. they in effect held a naval crew hostage for more than a year before releasing them. though the pueblo is a mere footnote to the tumultuous events of 1968. robert mcnamara was involved as a major participant. we all know that. but what's remarkable is that mr. mcnamara knew the details, he knew the specifics of what was going on. in an interview once, i asked him how he could keep all of this turmoil straight in his mind. he looked at me as if i were mildly deranged, and he said, well, it's -- actually, it's quite simple. you just compartmentalize things and then just deal with them individually. i wonder now if
CSPAN
May 10, 2012 11:00pm EDT
relatively confidently say the united states and europe remain each other's best parkhurst and that when the american president or european leader looks how the public and says pudu one call when there's a problem of the person on the other side of the cleantech. my judgment is that is not going to change anytime soon partly because of the affinity of interest of the values and also there aren't other options and even though there are emerging countries out your waist count on our european allies and to rely on our european allies more than we can count on a cost-cutting. at the same time i think it's clear that we are at the cusp of a major historic transition in the global landscape in which the world that nato represents his losing the primacy it enjoyed the last 200 years and if you look at the share of global product represented by nato and i would include japan because they are a part of the western world since world war ii we've gone from roughly 70% of the global product to 50% and we are headed towards 40% and that says to me the big security question of the day are about h
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 4:00pm EDT
. even if it the united states doesn't could that, i worry the europeans would do that and more so the chinese, the russians and others. so we cannot allow that to happen. if iran is going to continue enriching during this process, we have to continue ratcheting up the sanctions. otherwise we're in a losing scenario here. >> nick? >> warren, i think the problem in both democratic and republican administrations in the past is that we haven't believed in diplomacy enough to give it a real try. every administration from jimmy carter to reagan on through to barack obama has had one or two disyou will tree meetings with the iranians in some conference room in vienna or geneva and that's it. so here's the problem for us. we're in an overheated political environment, we're in an election year. and some people will want to set up a construct that if the president doesn't succeed within a month or two, he'll have failed. and that's not in our interest. we've got to have more patience, and a longer-term strategic view. so i would say, commit ourselves to a serious bout of diplomacy. diplomat
CNN
May 1, 2012 4:00pm EDT
relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the third time that president obama has made this trip. it's been over a year. the last time he was there was in december 2010 and furthermore, at the presidential palace which is where he is right now for brief remarks with president hamid karzai and to sign the strategic partnership agreement with afghanistan to talk about the u.s. relationship with afghanistan beyond 2014. that's extraordinary. the last time the president was in afghanistan in december of 2010 he could not make that trip from bagram air force base which is about 30 miles or so north of kabul to the palace because of weather concerns, and cer
MSNBC
May 2, 2012 1:00am PDT
schedule put out by the white house where the president of the united states turned out to be a deliberate fabrication because for security reasons he made a trip under the veil of secrecy. this is standard operating procedure for presidents visiting america's various war zones. shortly after the 2008 election in which he was elected president, after the election but before the new president had been sworn in in december of 2008, then still president george w. bush took one of these surprise trips the, unannounced trips to background. it was december 14th, 2008. that's when this happened. >> yes. everybody calm down for a minute. first of all, thank you for apologizing on behalf of the iraqi people. it doesn't bother me. if you want the facts, it's a size 10 shoe that he threw. >> boy, if you were not surprised enough to find out that the president had surprise, gone to iraq, the president having a shoe hurled at him was definitely a surprise that day. when you look at the official transcript from this, we posted a link to it on our blog tonight. when you go through the transcript of this
CNN
May 1, 2012 3:00pm EDT
president has landed safely in afghanistan, he flu there year night from the the united states. obviously he is there on the one year anniversary of the raid across the border in pakistan that led to the death of osama bin laden. we also know the president will address the nation tonight in the 7:00 hour, 7:30 p.m., he will address the nation from afghanistan. and we know while there he is scheduled to meet with the afghan president, hamid karzai and the two ledder leaders ared to sign a extstrategic agreemen between the two countries. this would create an alliance between the two countries essentially saying about this the years going forward when the u.s. combat troops are out of afghanistan, there would still be training and cooperation between the two countries. that has been morimportant to t united states to have a footprint in afghanistan going forward and as the country marks one year since the death of osama bin laden, there are still big questions about the security situation in afghanistan. you were talking about occasional problems with the taliban. and this is separate from t
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 9:00am EDT
evening. i want to start with a question. could it be that the first time in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now comcast your mind back -- cast your mind back to a decade ago, that question would seem absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would he need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we have become to the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke i heard probably about 5000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19 century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is taking up washington in a remote area and the soldier rides up and he declares old woman, from this day forth, this man -- this land is no longer politically his imperial russian. she watches him go. thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winte
CSPAN
May 10, 2012 6:00pm EDT
united states needs to work in concert with our allies. we need to work in concert particularly with those countries in the united nations that form with us the p-5. russia i think shares the goal. i won't speak for sergei. i think i will let them speak. i think they share the goal of stability and an end to violence. we share a strategic vision of what's happening in syria, but we've had some disagreement on the tactics that we should take to bring that about. we are committed to continuing to do everything in our power to end the violence, to see an orderly succession take place. we have made very clear we think president asad's time has come and gone, and we hope very, very much through the dialog we've had with russia and with our other partners in new york, that we will continue to find ways to hasten that kind of change in transition so that the people in syria can live normal lives free from violence. >> i will add to that that we want violence ceased. we want political dialog of all the signs in syria to be engaging and successful because we do not believe that anybody in was
CSPAN
May 8, 2012 10:30pm EDT
things he said was that russia will also seek a predictable relationship with the united states. will adhere to the treaty on nuclear arms. and push for guarantees that the u.s. missile shield in europe will not be directed against russia. its that something that -- that he wants in writing or is that a trust but verify type of thing. or -- how, what does that mean? that statement? >> well we, have had a discussion with russia since -- since lisbon. where the nato allies agreed -- to, for the first time to deploy a -- a nato territorial missile defense system that would provide protection for nato european territories, populations and forces against a growing ballistic missile threat from outside of europe. that decision was not directed at russia. nor were the systems that were going to be deployed, capable of undermining strategic stability with russia or indeed undermine the nuclear deterrent of russia. we have been saying this for three years. we, we are, more than happy to put it in writing because we have already done so. would be happy to do it in the future. the second thing w
CSPAN
May 11, 2012 10:30am EDT
the time i have been here. the french socialists are not strangers for the united states. they shouldn't be strangers. it has been true that it has been 17 years since the socialists were in power at the presidency. of course, they ran the government about a decade ago when spauo was in power. we have always had a very good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with this government in france. we do have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. it's one thing to be campaigning. it is always something different to be governing. it is not me. it is not my job to predict how this will evolve. i will note that francoi francois hollande campaigned to keep france in the military structure. that was a remarkable statement after nicolas sarkozy to come back into the structure. i think france learned in the libya operation that being integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and say over what happens in the internal affairs of the military operation. that's important. you learn
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 5:00am EDT
trade of the united states. and less than 2 point something of russian foreign trade. which suggests in turn that neither united states nor russia are to each other an important economic partner. just for example with our neighbor in ukraine our trade is 20% higher. with eu it is -- it is almost ten times hyper. -- ten times higher. so what it means, it means we are missing a good economic underpinning for political relations. and that leaves them still vulnerable to the politics of the day, to the crisises of the day, and, and unnecessarily so. we certainly have a lot of things that we have in common in terms of challenges that we face. and i, once drew a list of things that unite us. it appears much longer. we don't see eye to eye. and i would submit important for russia and hopefully for the united states. we have progress aid lot through the last three years. reset has brought a lot of new things, a lot of new way of doing things. the commission that was established by the two presidents seems to be producing new ideas, new avenues for, for cooperation, both between the
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 12:00pm EDT
united states in that particular area. many other examples of this exist and i think the hope is that as we identify this brigade in the united states that will be rotating battalions to europe. possibly twice annually, although we're still working on the frequency of that, that will also be a way to enhance training in the alliance answer a new u.s. contribution to the nato response force and, again, we can get into those details in the q&a. i fear i've spoken too long already. i'm going to leave it at that and turn it over to the next person on the panel. thank you. >> julianne, thank you very much for rapidly going through what is a packed agenda, when you, start to look at these issues and it's very difficult in the time you have. you were very generous i think as well to describe britain's future defense struggles as a bell curve and i think within the u.k. they've been described as kind of black hole around $35 billion worth of defense expenditures which have been pushed into the future, because the country can't afford to pay for it now. we're looking at the kind of carrier progra
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 12:00pm EDT
enforcement actually works for arizona, but it does not work for the united states. observations that the population of arizona has simply gone to other states is accurate. so what arizona has tried to do while an effort at the state level to address the impact of illegal immigration is not a sound policy in the framework of what we need to do as a nation. those hyperbolic claims of racism reflects a racist construct of how our community works together and it's just as destructive as those who are motivated to demand a purge of all non-native born from the basis of a racist ideology and i for swain, enough. we need a sane approach. secure sovereign borders, account for those without lawful authority. engage in necessary bureaucratic reform and engage all levels of government for ongoing, internal enforcement and let me elab eate a little on that because i think that's what todd wanted to hear from me. secure our sovereign borders. our border must be operationally secure for several important reasons. number one, there isnis an inte security component. five years, peopleitarianed at the bo
CNN
May 1, 2012 1:00pm PDT
news. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> we're following the breaking news. dramatic developments. president obama's surprise trip to afghanistan exactly one year after the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden in neighboring pakistan. less than an hour or so ago we got the first word of his arr e arrival at the bagram air base. he is now in kabul meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai to sign a long-term strategic partnership agreement at a rather precarious time for relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the thir
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 6:30pm EDT
leader should have no doubt about the resolve of the united states or about israel's sovereign right to defend itself. as the president has said, we take no options off the table. of course, iran's nuclear program is not the only regional issue that is of concern to israel or its leaders. in a period of sweeping regional change that brings new opportunities but also new challenges and uncertainties, the united states will continue to bear israel's security in mind as we develop and implement our foreign policy in response to these challenges. concerning israel's neighbor, syria, we believe that the longer assad remains in power, the greater the risk that his brutal tactics will destabilize syria and possibly the region. for that reason, we are working with our international partners to pressure assad to step down as soon as possible so that a syrian-led stable and democratic transition can get going. in egypt we have supported the historic transition to democracy that began last spring. this will continue to be a bumpy ride. as egyptians debates freely the big issues of the day for the
CSPAN
May 8, 2012 6:30pm EDT
from outside the united states today, we hope that you will, 202-628-0184. as always, we'll be taking your tweets, looking at your e-mails and the conversation continues on facebook. our first call comes from spokane, washington. mary on our line for republicans. you're on "the washington journal." go ahead. >> ye >>. >> caller: yeah, here in the united states, we have the same issues you're having over there, but your countries always seem more on the ball to listen to the people. and i was wondering why -- i always suggested how come you guys go to the people and ask their opinion or like i suggested here in the state, there's a lot of people in the united states that are intelligent. they just can't physically work, but they have product ideas or business ideas that could make the country money. and if we had some kind of a competition with the people to come up with ideas to promote new business, new products in the country. then we're allowing the people to somewhat have a certain amount of say in their country so they don't feel so lost. at the same time, it will make a h
WETA
May 20, 2012 9:30am EDT
issue congresswoman norton affected by think sea change of united states becoming majority-minority company. >> we best make haste because the new majority is the least well educated to compete our country in the global economy. >> with low birth rate and 10,000 baby boomers entering medicare every day, this will help fill that fiscal gap that we have of taxpayer government funded programs. >> i'm going to echo what the congresswoman said, education is the most important issue, these communities have higher barriers for both higher education, k-12 education furlong time we've said that is a hispanic issue, black issue, now all of our issue. how we educate those students is how the country will change in the next hundred years. >> i think we have immigrants paying info a system that they're not necessarily eligible for. and in addition we have increasing number of nontraditional families who deserve ownership over their retirement assets. >> entitlement reforms? you're saying that -- >> social security reform. medicare. >> there are people who are paying phone a system that they're n
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 10:30am EDT
nautical miles from shore. the relevant area for the united states is probably more than 1.5 times the size of texas. in fact, we believe it could be considerably larger. u.s. oil and gas companies are now ready, willing, and able to explore this area. but they have made it clear to us that they need the maximum level of international legal certainty before they will or could make the substantial investments. and we believe create many jobs in doing so, needed to extract these far offshore resources. if we were a party to the convention, we would gain international recognition of our sovereign rights, including by using the convention's procedures and therefore, be able to give our oil and gas companies this legal certainty. staying outside the convention, we simply cannot. the second development concerns deep seabed mining which takes place in that part of the ocean floor that is beyond any country's jurisdiction. now, for years, technological challenges meant that deep seabed mining was only theoretical. today's advances make it very real. but it's also very expense of. and before an
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 4:30pm EDT
congress has ever delineated the outer edge of the continental shelf of the united states. other countries can prohibit the united states from coming in to an ecs. we can't, because we're not party to the treaty. the only way to protect that outside of this is to have -- t accede to the treaty. and finally, no company is going to put millions of dollars into the effort to go out and do the mining or do the drilling if they don't have the legal certainty protection of the treaty. so, there are further reasons in answer to mr. fuller. we'll have mr. fuller in here and others who oppose it have a chance to explore this. senator menendez. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for beginning this series of hearings, which i think is incredibly important. couple of years ago, i chaired the beginning of one of these on your behalf. i think it is even more important today than it was then. i appreciate all of our distinguished witnesses and their service to our country. general dempsey, when you took an oath as the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and when you took an oath to the se
MSNBC
May 2, 2012 4:00am EDT
agreement which committed the united states to end our war in iraq. it was an agreement that president obama then followed through on. the last u.s. troops left iraq in december. today, in afghanistan it was not a status of forces agreement. it was called a strategic partnership agreement between the u.s. and afghan government but the idea is the same. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want to assert their sovereignty and bui
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 6:00am EDT
. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding the euro zone and pu
CSPAN
May 18, 2012 11:00am EDT
evolving trends in this field. september 11th hijackers used united states and foreign financial institutions to hold, move, and retrieve their money. they deposited money into united states accounts via wire transfers and depp sits of traveler's checks and cash that was brought from overseas. they kept funds in foreign accounts which they accessed through atmst and credit card transactions in the home land. according to the september 11th commission, the plot cost al qaeda somewhere in the range of $400,000 to $500,000, of which approximately $300,000 passed through the hijackers' bank casualties here in the united states. after the attacks, the united states publicly declared that the fight against al qaeda financing was as critical as the fight against al qaeda itself. the charge of the united states intelligence and law enforcement communities was clear -- if we choke off the terrorists' money, we limit their ability to conduct mass casualty attacks. within months of the attacks, the department of defense, the fbi, the cia, and perhaps most importantly the department of treas
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 1:00am EDT
debated near the two weeks and it was touch and go. why it was expedient for the united states to go to great britain after all. >>host: did we have the standing army? >> it was small. on paper bree word to have 10,000. on the eve of the war it is about half of that. but the federalist were opposed to war. at the time they were compliant the the federalist but the not unlike jefferson but there were based roughly new england and in particular herb massachusetts and connecticut. the stake government's probably the majority of people republican-led congressmen were assaulted by people. the president was haying in effigy. the federalist that the republicans wordpro french and it would serve the interest to napoleon. they wanted to train with the british empire and generally and their wanted to cut off train but to also the board was not in their interest as they understood it. it was local and eventually that to culminates at the harvard convention late 1814. the purpose was to pressure the government to give a defense which england does not do well by that stage. and then to pay for the d
FOX News
May 24, 2012 12:00pm PDT
, surprise, the negotiators rejected plans by the united states and five other world powers to curb the rogue nation's nuclear program. iran also insisted it had a right to enrich uranium accusing other nations of creating a "difficult atmosphere for talks." yesterday, officials pointed to signs that iran would be open to an agreement restarting nuclear inspections, but as the talks draw to a close, there is no sign of a deal. u.s. and other world leaders accusative ran of using the program as a cover for building a nuclear bomb. iran claims the program is for peaceful purposes only. and steve is live if us today in baghdad. steve? >>reporter: well, we are getting more details of some of the main goals for the negotiators for the sex -- six powers, with a main goal for iran to stop producing highly enriched uranium. this is the kind of material that can be developed very quickly into fuel for use in a nuclear weapon. >> iran's declared readiness to address the issue of 20 percent enrichment and came with its own five-point plan including their assertion that we recognize their right to
CNN
May 1, 2012 3:00pm PDT
i'm anderson cooper. we welcome our viewers across the united states and around the globe to the special report, president obama addressing the american people from afghanistan, talking about the future of u.s. troops there and we are going to bring that to you live. >> lots of news happening now, dramatic developments covering the president's surprise visit to afghanistan like no one else can. we have our reporters in afghanistan, in pakistan, in washington, in new york, we're watching all of this unfold, our own john king will give us an inside look at what it's like to be on a secret presidential trip to a war zone. he's been on one before, our own erin burnett looks at al qaeda's future and our christiane amanpour and fareed zakariazaka. >> the president took a helicopter to kabul and signed a strategic partnership agreement with president hamid karzai. it could mark the beginning of the end of the war there. listen. >> neither americans nor the afghan people asked for this war, yet for a decade we've stood together to drive al qaeda from its camps to battle an insurgency and
CNN
May 1, 2012 6:00pm EDT
perhaps be on their way home, bagram being a hub or many troops returning back to the united states and i think keen to try to suggest as he said a year ago the tide of war is still receding, choosing this anniversary, the death of bin laden, the man for americans the reason why they came to afghanistan, choosing the anniversary of his death to take this narrative an extra stage forwards and explaining exactly how america will tie up the loose ends of the decades-long war and how his presence will look like in the years ahead. >> nick what is the strategic partnership agreement? it doesn't talk about funding. those say this is more about, this isn't really, some saying kind of sets out the logistics of what's going to happen over the next ten years, after 2014. >> it's very strong on symbolism, not heavy on substance. it's important for america that it was signed, that it happened because for months there were outstanding issues that made it look like it may never come to fruition. it's important it was signed ahead of this vital summit in chicago in may, where nato allies have to put f
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm EDT
what the united states was like. now, basically just there is a lot of different ways to define and understand pluralism and so just for our purposes of fairly straight forward and basic definition of it is a vision of in this case the united states as a country with many different cultures, many different ethnic groups and there isn't one single american identity that everyone has to subscribe to in every way. another way to think about it is the way in which immigrants could identify themselves. they could identify themselves in hyphenated terms as irish american, polish american and italian american and what i want to do today is get at the roots of that identity, the roots of the development of that conception of what the united states is. we're to do it by going through three different sections, three different sets of developments. the first is going to be the world of party politics like the image we just looked at from the period from about 1840 to the end of the 19th century. it is a period when there is very stiff competition between the two major parties for votes and tha
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 5:30am EDT
united states 20 years after adoption of constitution. i would say that we are extremely proud of what we have been able to achieve. we are continuing. we have faults in the way we apply sometimes the rules we, ourselves, develop and we are working on them. there have been a number of things that have been recently introduced in order to make our democracy more modernized and more adapt to the wish of the people as a result of political debate that is more and more lively. so whatever is happening in russia is because we do it for ourselves, not because we are told to by americans or anybody else. i think that what we have been doing in russia is falling in line with your ability to work with us as a real partners. if that is not the case, and once again, i would like to draw your attention to what john said and i fully agree with him that pntr needs to be granted in a way that wouldn't undermine russian/american relations. ambassador schwab referred to the legislation. we all know what it is. however, i do not know the final version of what it is going to be. we know what is behind it. i
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 10:00pm EDT
monumental importance, and while it may be controversial within the halls of the united states congress, i have the feeling that the more the american people understand this concept, the more support that there will be. and i think it's fair for me to tell you that i do not expect the legislation that we'll be discussing today to be passed tomorrow or the next few months. for the united states congress, this is a fairly radical piece of legislation. we have many billions of dollars of opposition that will be out there from drug companies and other sources. but i believe from the bottom of my heart that this issue is so important that discussion has got to begin as soon as possible, and that's what we're doing today. so the ideas that people may be hearing on c-span today may seem fairly radical. in a few years they're not. i think what we're talking about is fairly sense cal and they're best for our country and people throughout the world. i want to thank all of you for being here, not just for being here today but for the work many of you have done for many, many years on this subject. i
CSPAN
May 9, 2012 5:00pm EDT
. historically each time that the united states has entered into almost any kind of treaty we have been very acidious in doing everything we could to follow that treaty. we have not always been afforded the reciprocal courtesy. i suggest that a new start is a good example of what happens when we don't negotiate in a way that is only in the best interest of the united states. we in the first phase of new start reduced our strategic war head counts significantly without really impacting the russians a great deal when the tactical war heads were left completely out of the equation and part of that promise was that we would modernize our nuclear weapons capability. and it just seems like over time things degrade. and to give a president as flexible as this one the ability to enter into treaties without congressional approval on something as critical as our space assets and our space access is, i think, a foolish ernd on our part and i hope we suggest that. >> gentleman from california, five minutes. >> some time ago mr. andrews suggested that we try to avoid presidential politics as we continue
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 11:00am EDT
united states that we have to c acede to this convention. we say that every time we argue with iran, with north korea. we argue on the base that they're not abiding by international rules. they're not abiding by the international standards that we've established. and here we are, trying to make the same argument with regards to navigation and we aren't even a member of the convention. that's the reason. >> thank you. >> let me just say, since there are a few seconds left, senator lugar, that neither president truman's proclamation or any act of congress has ever defined the outer edge of the continental shelf of the united states. other countries can prohibit the united states from coming in to an esc. we can't, because we're not party to the treaty. the only way to protect that outside of this is to have -- to a acede to the treaty. so, there are further reasons in answer to mr. fuller. we'll have mr. fuller in here and others who have oppose it to have a chance to explore this. senator hernandez? >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for beginning this series of hearings, which i
CBS
May 20, 2012 5:00am PDT
northern california and the northwestern united states. >>> you've been here for four years and you're about to enter tour of duty. and what is the israel center. greatcoat the department of the center cisco federation. established about 15 or 16 years ago to be a bridge between israel and the bay area's jewish committee. >>> both of you've been in the jewish committee in the bay area for a good amount of time. i'm wondering what are some of your observations about how the bay area understands the state to visit israel and that is really a culture >>> i found i divided into a couple of things but first the jewish committee here in the bay area is a large and fibrinogen very deeply connected to israel. and we feel great kinship israel is the unusual nation state of the world people. the jewish committee instinctively understands that since the connection between us is very strong and here in the bay area have felt very good in the last four years the political support for israel among elected officials as a very strong it's great understanding and french than the economic connection to
Current
May 24, 2012 5:41am PDT
president of the united states. >> bill: what are the republicans thinking when, for example, like on the violence against women act or the lily led led better act and the federal leave act and all of these issues which do impact just the rights of women to be considered first class citizens i guess in this country. laura, what are they thinking? >> i don't know what they're thinking. a lot of their moves have not been very politically smart lately. but you see them like, for instance, with the violence against women act, republicans put forth a woman to introduce the act sandy adams from florida. she was actually a domestic violence victim. she didn't actually write the bill but they basically boehner chose her and said because you're a woman and you were abused, you're going to sponsor this and it is going to make us look less anti-woman here. we've got all of these republican women that are supporting it so how can it be a war on women. it is a war on democratic ideals. so i think that's the route that they're trying to take here. and i don't think that it is necessarily working. >> bi
SFGTV2
May 7, 2012 6:00am PDT
century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoir
SFGTV2
May 21, 2012 6:00am PDT
. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuousl
MSNBC
May 1, 2012 3:00pm EDT
outline the relationship between the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the withdrawal plan. we expect the president to address the nation and u.s. troops at 7:31 our time. that's a speech that will last for about 10 to 15 minutes, martin. and we will, of course, be carrying that live. president obama has arrived in afghanistan. he is meeting with afghanistan president hamid karzai. of course, this all comes on the one-year anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. certainly this timing is not coincidental but president obama there to discuss the strategic partnership with the president of afghanistan, including the plan for withdrawal. >> and do you know anything or any detail yet about how this was carried out? because we knew absolutely nothing about it. the president clearly leaving the white house. i mean, i'm assuming that somebody must have known. what do we know about the detail of that? >> well, we know that of course, senior administration officials were aware of this plan. but the white house certainly keepi
CSPAN
May 1, 2012 10:30pm EDT
united states and is the author of several scholarly works, 19th and 20th tariff policy. long a civil war buff, his attention turned to the presidency of abraham lincoln after a fortuitous discovery at library of congress. the find marked the beginning of a four year hunt for documents culminating in his book, co-authored with sebastian page, lincoln and the movement for black resettlement. in addition to writing, dr. magnus is an academic programs director at the institute for humane studies at george mason university, also taught in public administration at american university, and international tragtional trade . also in his biography, something i find fascinating. he is an avid scuba diver. and plays underwater hockey. for the washington, d.c., and i love this name -- beltway bottom feeders. there is probably no end of applicants for that team. after dr. magnus makes his presentation, rodney ross will come to read a poem of -- of john willis menard that is very appropriate. actually there are copies, print copies of it on the table outside. rod is, is an old front and a dear frien
CNN
May 21, 2012 4:00pm EDT
hamid karzai sits down for his only interview with me while in the united states. we talk about his personal relationship with president obama and even his personal relationship with mitt romney. stand by for that as well. >>> and the man sometimes nicknamed america's supermayor, has made a super gaffe. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in chicago. you're in the situation room. >>> but first, through my exclusive far reaching interview, i just completed only a few minutes ago with the afghan president hamid karzai, it's his only interview while here in the united states. we sat down only moments ago, and he spoke of president obama just minutes before the interview. the three leaders are here for a meeting in chicago. listen to this. >> no, we didn't have a three-way meeting, we had a three-way photograph taking. >> just a photo opportunity? >> why not a meeting? why not have a three-way meeting and discuss the most important issues facing afghanistan, pakistan and the united states. >> it wasn't for us to decide on the three-way meeting. the united states was the host and perhaps they saw it fi
MSNBC
May 1, 2012 12:00pm PDT
recommend that people take a look at peel's previous statements. the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >> we have breaking news at this very moment. we understand the president is in afghanistan. this on the first anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. we understand that he traveled there overnight. there was something of a "meet the press" and media blackout but we are able to confirm the president is indeed in afghanistan. i'm joined now by kristen welker who is at the white house. please tell us what do you know? what have you heard? >> hi there. good afternoon to you. we can tell you that president obama arrived in afghanistan in kabul at 2:39 p.m. our time, which is 11:09 in afghanistan. right now, he is at the afghan presidential palace with president hamid karzai. we're just getting this information so i'll read it to you. he is there to sign the strategic partnership agreement which is essentially going to outline the relationship between the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline f
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 12:00pm EDT
between billions and trillions of dollars that we would not have the in the united states and would be transferred to, in accordance with the u.n. international sea base authority. now, the way we arrive at this and the way to put this in context i would say between 12 and 18 % of royalties is about as much as they are going to allow and still continue to develop those resources. 7 so the united states would receive in that area, according to this task force, somewhere between 12.5 and 18.75% in royalties. now, the problem with this is, that under article 82, the law of the sea treaty, would require the u.s. to give up after a period of time between seven and 12 years about 7% of this. so if we take the conservative side of what the task force has said and say just $1 trillion, $1 trillion would equate to $70 billion that would be royalties that would be paid to the isa as "pos opposed to the united states and of course go to the organization in kingston, jamaica for redistribution to the developing world. and this is the first time in history that an international organization, the u.
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 5:30pm EDT
history underway in the united states. tim was the founding director of that project. after his service on that project and continuing to publish other acclaimed books, he now actually holds his job as the collector of the richard nixon library out in california. as the director of the nixon library, tim has not only been organizing world history projects of his own, he's actually set precedents in almost setting the model of how to run a presidential library under the most difficult possible circumstances. it's a tribute to his abilities. then to tim's right, your left is bob strong. i know bob strong principally through his scholarship. bob works in that strange netherworld where you study american politics by understanding its political history. some days he looks like a political historian and could be an exemplar of both. i think he's probably the single most prominent and important historian of the carter presidency to publish so far. his work on carter's foreign policy is today the standard work that any scholar looking at that must read. today bob is also at washington u
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 8:00pm EDT
community have ratified the treaty but the united states is not to read to the secretary of state hillary clinton and defense secretary leon panetta urged the senate to approve the treaty setting national security, job creation and oil exploration. they testified at the senate foreign relations committee. it's just under three hours. >> the hearing will come to order. thank you all very much for being with us today. secretary clinton, secretary panetta and general dempsey, welcome, we are privileged to have you here today. we thank you for joining us. it's a rare occasion in any committee but in this committee when we have simultaneously a panel of witnesses that brings together americans top diplomat, our country's top descends official and our nation's top military officer. your presence here altogether powerfully underscores the importance that you put on this issue. our committee shares the sense of importance which is why i hope without respect to party or ideology we begin an open, honest and comprehensive discussion about whether the united states of america should join the law of
CNN
May 1, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>>> 30 minutes from now the president of the united states will address the american people. >> welcome to cnn's breaking news coverage of president obama's surprise visit to afghanistan. the president will be telling us about the new strategic partnership agreement he has just signed with afghanistan's president outlining the relationship between the united states and afghanistan after the withdrawal of u.s. forces at the end of 2014. white house officials tell us the timing was driven by the negotiations over that agreement at an upcoming nato summit. critics will say it is about politics. everyone knows today is the anniversary of the raid in pakistan that killed osama bin laden. on the ground, do people there -- are they aware that president obama is on the ground? >> reporter: late in the afternoon the sun went down there was a report on afghan media suggesting that he was already in kabul. since then we have seen absolute silence across the city occasionally by helicopters and that is presumably some part of the president in and out of the capital. the speech we are ab
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 5:30pm EDT
that sea faring nations, including the united states, have observed for centuries. given that we haven't, to date, had any major disruptions at sea, can you respond to that and talk about why it's -- why the sense now is that it's imperative to ratify the treaty? >> i can. the customary international law evolves and i can give you an example of something on the land domain in a moment. but it evolves. and it is subject to individual interpretations. so, threading this back to my earlier answer. the rise of new nations competing for resources, brazil, russia, india, china, the list goes on and on. their rise puts us in a position where unless we have this convention with which to form a basis to have the conversation about resources of the sort you're talking about, does cause us to be increasingly at risk to instability. and that's my job, instability. the secretary can speak eloquently about the economic h i issues, but i'm speaking to the security issues. so that is what has changed. and i'll give you the example of the land domain that i mentioned. we are party to the geneva c
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military c
Current
May 3, 2012 5:00pm PDT
. some people say to me wait a minute what you are forgetting is the united states didn't have much competition in those days we won the war and japan and europe were not major competitors. but even today germany, other countries like germany, they have a social compact very similar to the one we had. and that means german workers are enjoying the benefits of productivity increases, unemployment is relatively low, and their standard of living is very high, and the very rich take home a much smaller share of the total gains from growth than they do in the united states. >> professor i want to focus on that last issue, because you are exactly correct. you know i agree with you, any importance of unions and the social account that we all believe will help the entirety of our population central to what we should be doing. let's talk about trade in particular, because we have entered a series of multi-lateral and by bilateral trade agreements how can workers compete against labor in the number you hear is 2 to 3 billion additional workers competes against our domestic work force. so that
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 6:00pm EDT
my reading of article 162 that the power of the council, this body on which the united states has a seat and has what you described as veto power, is a recommending body and it appears also to me as i look back at 160, section 160, subsection 2g that it is up to the assembly and not to the council to decide upon the equitable sharing of financial and other economic benefits from activities in the area. so, secretary clinton, i was wondering if you could help me understand is my reading correct or am i missing something? >> senator, the assembly cannot take up an issue unless recommended by the council. any decision that would impose any obligations on the united states or otherwise deal with substance must go through the council. the secretariat has no decision making authority. the practical consequence of this is that the united states would have the right to reject or veto any decision that would result in a substantive obligation on the united states or that would have financial and budgetary implications, and that is due to the fact that the u.s. is unique in having a permanent
FOX News
May 5, 2012 2:00pm EDT
the united states embassy, and he asked for release and guarantee of safe treatment but chen guangcheng said china threatened his family if he did not leave the embassy and the united states urged him to make a decision quickly and no he fears for his family's safety and want as asylum in america. he may get his wish with a visa to study not united states, what does this tell us about modern china and about obama's china policy? dramatic escape. he climbed over walls to escape house arrest, injured himself, is driven by heroic colleagues in the human rights community, 300 miles to beijing and stays in safe houses before they say he has to go to the embassy for safety. what does this episode toll us about china? >> during the cold war getting into the embassy gate would have been the happy ending but, now, it does not work out that way. what it tells us about china is contrary to the school of thought here is a country that is increasingly confident that it will be the second great power of the 21st century they are terrified of blind legal activistses living under house arres
SFGTV2
May 10, 2012 2:00am PDT
turns out if you look at the successful record of immigrants to the united states, whether skilled or unskilled, documented or undocumented, across the last 200 years and particularly in the last 25 years and with the great renaissance of data that we now have at our disposal to analyze more clearly the impact of all types of immigration from 1990 forward, we realize that immigrants, again, skilled and unskilled, lawful and undocumented, bring to the effort of community building and business building and economy building something that is moderately intangible for now. if we work at it for a few more years it will be tangible and we will be able to quantify part of it. it's something that represents itself in generational achievement both for those immigrants who arrive, who form small businesses at a rate which is disproportionately higher than native-born citizens, for their children that in turn achieve at a level that is higher on average than the children of native-born citizens, not to disparage those who come from the united states or come from long lines of families that come
CSPAN
May 10, 2012 5:30pm EDT
one, russia is going to become a member of the wto this year. two, whether the united states graduates russia from jackson vannic or not, and therefore, three, the sooner the united states can move ahead with our own process so that we can fully take advantage of the, of russia's joining, becoming a member of the wto, the better. that's sort of the short version. the slightly longer version is that it's somewhat more complicated than all this, as we know with implications for the various actors and i would begin by offering principle kudos and congratulations to the u.s. business community which has been up on capitol hill day in and day out making the case why it is in the interest of the united states as well as russia for them to join the wto. it is much in the interest of u.s. produced manufactured goods, agricultural exporters, servic services exporters, for russia to lower its bear yars to trade, for there to be dispute resolution enforcement opportunities, for those of you familiar with a remember site known as global trade alerts, the g-20 in november of 2008 at the front end o
WETA
May 6, 2012 10:00am EDT
-- greatly different than the united states. >> i think it made segregation almost look like a civil affairs -- whereas in south africa it was an art, science, and something white students could study at universities. >> before we go to the break, you mentioned nelson mandela. you mentioned that the african national congress. how did you all come together, the two of you? >> i went to high school at the school bus was known much more for its left-leaning and trotsky ideology. so, my conversion to the african national congress came a lot more because i enjoyed the inclusive become of the focus on activism. i enjoyed the way in which it joyfully understood how it could take the struggle against apartheid, that while there was life and death of risks involved, we were still able to celebrate our humanity and not to give it up at all. so, in 1980, my great conversion to what we call congress politics, the politics of the african national congress, happened, but i remain ever thankful for the theoretical rigor i learned from the kind of trotsky movement which i emerged from. >> june 12 as
WHUT
May 6, 2012 6:00pm EDT
europe, in the united states, and other places in the world. we don't have to be perpetual strangers within our host countries. we don't have to seek to create an islamic system where we live. we can live where we don't make the rules. we can live according to the values and objectives of our faith without necessarily wanting to insist that every rule and regulation should be inscribed in that country. in south africa has reached an south african muslim, in particular, have reaped all the benefits of living democratically, abiding by human rights conventions, by subscribing to the rule of law, embracing every other variety in the country. and therefore, we have found peace among ourselves and peace with our neighbors, and that is the elusive model that the muslim world is looking for, and that is the elusive model that western countries are looking for and trying to understand this phenomenon of the other who happen to be muslim coming and living cheek by jowl with him. >> many languages in south africa? many different cultures? then the south africa has an enormous number of tribes
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 3:30pm EDT
hagemini in the region. this supreme leader built an -- towards the united states. so if you are assessing american interests and looking at the region, you have to look at what iran's behave hear been towards american interests over time. i can say this, actually, even though you're asking me to assume a different persona, back in the 1990s when i was a negotiator in the middle east, we were constantly contending with iranian-inspired efforts to subvert the peace process through acts of terror. so there's a history here of being hofstile towards american interests. we have seen different iranian leaderships 24r50e69 leaderships at least in the forms of their presidents, talking about a dialogue of civilizations and the possibilities of trying to find ways of building bridges between the two sides. he was clearly not able to deliver very much. if anything at all. so i think we have to look at iran through a lens of hostility and threats. i think we also have to look at iran through a lens that, their behave hear, from time to time, been adjusted tactical. not strategically but ta
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 5:10pm EDT
united states and europe that this does not represent a strategic pivot on the part of the institution or the center to east asia. it has been our pleasure, and i hope of some contribution to the policy community in partnership with the heinrich boll's foundation to bring the conference to you on an annual basis. and i think it is particularly appropriate that we should have filled with us today. -- phil with us today. he is secretary of state of european affairs and is responsible for u.s. policy toward about 50 countries, as well as three key -- and i would add to that currently, someone challenged international institutions -- the north of montreal organization, the european union, and the european union -- the north atlantic treaty organization, the european union, and the european -- phil is back with us and will talk to us about president obama and his relationship with our friends and allies. after he finishes his opening remarks there will be a discussion involving as many of you as possible moderated by the director of research at the center. over to you. [applause] >> thanks
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 10:00am EDT
the gulf. this is a bill for the entire united states of america. it's a bill for the taxpayers, for heavens sake. so senator tester, thank you for your leadership and that of senator vitter and i appreciate senator moran coming on to -- i don't have questions because the questions i would have asked had been asked while i was listening, but thank you very much. let's keep this you and let's redouble our resolve to actually get an accomplishment for the taxpayers and for the american public. >> well, thank you, senator -- >> live now on capitol hill this morning where the senate health committee and senate subcommittee on primary health and ageing is holding a hearing on the cost of hiv/aids drugs. senator bernie sanders has introduced a bill to shorten the time before generics can be made of those drugs. it includes an annual $3 billion prize for hiv/aids drug research. testifying this morning nobel laureate economist joseph stiglitz, harvard law professor lawrence less ig and a number of public health figures. vermont senator bernie sanders is chairing this hearing. he's in the roo
CSPAN
May 4, 2012 1:30pm EDT
is the great co-none drum. what do we do? here again i am a believer. in the united states determines that it is in its vital national interest to remove this regime, then it should act comprehensively and decisively in an effort to do it. if it does not believe it it is in the vital national interest to resume it and in my judgment it is not a vital national interest, we should stay out and certainly not adopt the kind of half-baked ill advised, half measures that will get us into a military commitment without producing the desired results. arab-israeli peace. it is now closed for the season. it is missing three things. i am not idea logically opposed to this. it is not not happening because of some managic metaphysical reasons. there's no relit jat reason that israel yeahs and palestinians cannot end their conflict. it is simply missing three things. number one, leaders on each side who are prepared to pay the price for a conflict ending resolution. neither side right now is prepared to pay that price. two, the urgency that is required to make these decisions. nations like people ta
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 7:30am EDT
gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious father, we thank you for this clear whether today. our gracious fa
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